School Programs

Special Education Class Programs by School

Spruce Run School – grades PreK – grade 1

    • PSD Full Day/Half Day (ABA-based program)
    • Integrated Preschool (one P.M. session)
    • Pull-out Replacement Resource for ELA and Math only
    • In-class Replacement Resource for ELA and Math
    • In-class Support Resource for Science and S.S. (Full Inclusion Option)

     

Patrick McGaheran School – grades 2-3

    • Pull-out Replacement Resource for ELA and Math only
    • In-class Replacement Resource for ELA and Math
    • In-class Support Resource for Science and S.S. (Full Inclusion Option)
    • Pull-out Supplemental Reading

Round Valley School – grades 4-6

    • Pull-out Replacement Resource for ELA and Math only
    • In-class Replacement Resource for ELA and Math
    • In-class Support Resource for Science and S.S. (Full Inclusion Option)
    • LLD Self-Contained Class (Mild to Moderate)
    • Pull-out Supplemental Reading
    • Autism Self-Contained Class

Clinton Township Middle School – grades 7-8

    • Pull-out Replacement Resource for ELA and Math only
    • In-class Replacement Resource for ELA and Math
    • In-class Support Resource for Science and S.S.
    • Pull-out Supplemental Reading
    • Autism Self-Contained Class
    • In District Solutions

(Revised 9-1-16)


OCCUPATIONAL / PHYSICAL THERAPY IN THE SCHOOL SYSTEM

An occupational and physical therapist is a trained health care professional that uses purposeful, goal directed activities and task analysis to enable students with a disability to benefit from their individualized education programs (IEPs).  Federal law mandates that occupational therapy (OT) and physical therapy (PT) in the school system be educationally relevant.  In the school setting, occupational and physical therapy is a “related service” to special education under Part B of the Individuals with Disabilities Improvement Act (IDEIA).  This means that services must enhance or support educational goals as stated in the student’s IEP.  

Occupational Therapists in the school setting look at certain skills, which may interfere with a student’s educational performance:

  • Neuromuscular – range of motion, strength, postural control, shoulder stability

  • Sensory Processing – vestibular (movement), tactile (touch), proprioception (joint sense), ocular motor skills (eye muscle movements)

  • Motor Behavior – motor planning (ability to plan and perform movements) and bilateral coordination skills (using two hands together)

  • Fine-motor development

  • Handwriting

  • Visual motor (non-motor) and perceptual motor (motor) skills

  • Self-help skills

  • Pre-vocational skills

Physical Therapists in the school setting look at certain skills which may interfere with a student’s educational performance:

  • Neuromuscular – range of motions, strength, postural control, shoulder stability, joint ligamentous stability

  • Sensory Processing – vestibular (movement), tactile (touch), proprioception (joint sense), visual-ocular reflex, muscle-force generation

  • Motor behavior – motor planning (ability to plan and perform movements) and bilateral coordination skills (using two hands and feet together)

  • Gross-motor development

  • Developmental transitions and negotiate school environment

  • Adaptive equipment needs (wheelchair, orthotics, helmets, etc.)

The above areas can be addressed through a variety of intervention strategies, which may include direct therapy with the student, consultation with the teacher, modification of the environment, provision of adaptive equipment, and staff training.